How do you create the perfect burger?

There are a few chefs that think they have the answer.

Nathan Myhrvold

Nathan Myhrvold

Former technology chief at Microsoft, Nathan Myhrvold, who just happens to be a trained chef, and chef Maxime Bilet, conspired to create a multivolume cookbook bearing the name Modernist Cuisine. In the book, they reveal their take on the perfect burger.

We describe the burger in detail here. It’s basically a chef’s take on how to excite the taste buds in exponential fashion during the consumption of a burger.

Justin Warner

Justin Warner

Justin Warner, that Food Network celebrity chef that wears lipstick and eye makeup (well, they probably all do that . . . it’s TELEVISION), recently issued his Summer Burger Guide as part of his duties as brand spokesperson for California winemaker, Robert Mondavi. In the Guide he, of course, gussies up the humble burger, and suggests wine pairings. Really?

This sort of nonsense isn’t limited to the Americas side of the pond. We recently read a story in The Telegraph about Limey chef, Charles Michel, a food scientist at Oxford University, who had developed a nine-layer burger with specifications that were a bit more detailed than the electronics schematics for the Apollo spacecraft. According to Michel, the perfect height for a burger is 7 cm (that’s 2 ¾” for you Americans that are measurement-impaired).

Chef Michel's Burger

Chef Michel’s Burger

What we find interesting is that the photo used by The Telegraph to display the burger had to be at least 12 cm in height (12.1 cm if you count that crowning sesame seed). Which, of course, raises the question, “How do you possibly put nine layers of stuff on a burger without exceeding the 7 cm limit?”

Texans are big braggers. They even brag about being big braggers. They claim that the humble burger was first created by a Texan from Athens (Texas, not Italy) Fletcher Davis, known by most residents of Athens, as either “Uncle Fletch” or “Ole’ Dave”. So, who better than a Texan to respond to these claims by chefs that they have created the perfect burger than a Texan?

The lead reviewer for Latin American restaurant authority ComaBeba.com, who goes by the pen-name, Ollie O, fares from Texas and has that “hick” Texas accent to prove it. We decided to consult with Ollie O to see what his thoughts were on these fancy burgers. We sort of knew before we asked, what his response would be.

Here’s what Ollie O had to say.

How do you create the perfect burger?

There are a few chefs that think they have the answer.

Nathan Myhrvold

Nathan Myhrvold

Former technology chief at Microsoft, Nathan Myhrvold, who just happens to be a trained chef, and chef Maxime Bilet, conspired to create a multivolume cookbook bearing the name Modernist Cuisine. In the book, they reveal their take on the perfect burger.

We describe the burger in detail here. It’s basically a chef’s take on how to excite the taste buds in exponential fashion during the consumption of a burger.

Justin Warner

Justin Warner

Justin Warner, that Food Network celebrity chef that wears lipstick and eye makeup (well, they probably all do that . . . it’s TELEVISION), recently issued his Summer Burger Guide as part of his duties as brand spokesperson for California winemaker, Robert Mondavi. In the Guide he, of course, gussies up the humble burger, and suggests wine pairings. Really?

This sort of nonsense isn’t limited to the Americas side of the pond. We recently read a story in The Telegraph about Limey chef, Charles Michel, a food scientist at Oxford University, who had developed a nine-layer burger with specifications that were a bit more detailed than the electronics schematics for the Apollo spacecraft. According to Michel, the perfect height for a burger is 7 cm (that’s 2 ¾” for you Americans that are measurement-impaired).

Chef Michel's Burger

Chef Michel’s Burger

What we find interesting is that the photo used by The Telegraph to display the burger had to be at least 12 cm in height (12.1 cm if you count that crowning sesame seed). Which, of course, raises the question, “How do you possibly put nine layers of stuff on a burger without exceeding the 7 cm limit?”

Texans are big braggers. They even brag about being big braggers. They claim that the humble burger was first created by a Texan from Athens (Texas, not Italy) Fletcher Davis, known by most residents of Athens, as either “Uncle Fletch” or “Ole’ Dave”. So, who better than a Texan to respond to these claims by chefs that they have created the perfect burger than a Texan?

The lead reviewer for Latin American restaurant authority ComaBeba.com, who goes by the pen-name, Ollie O, fares from Texas and has that “hick” Texas accent to prove it. We decided to consult with Ollie O to see what his thoughts were on these fancy burgers. We sort of knew before we asked, what his response would be.

Here’s what Ollie O had to say.

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